Ted Bundy is one of the most notorious serial killers in history. Do you know anything about his first (known) victim?

Quick notes:

  • Lynda Ann Healey, Bundy’s first known victim, was a hard-working college student en route to earn her degree in psychology.
  • When she went missing in 1974, police struggled to determine whether or not foul play occurred. It would be years before she received justice.

By the time that Ted Bundy (a.k.a. The Campus Killer) was caught, the damage to countless young lives had been done. He had killed a stunning number of victims, 30 of which he was willing to fess up to. While he had a plethora of victims, one name stands out: Lynda Ann Healey. What makes her unique? She was Bundy’s first known victim.

Healey’s life before Bundy’s brutality

Lynda Ann Healey’s upbringing was simple. She grew up in Seattle with loving parents. As a young woman, she was known for both her brains and her beauty. Before crossing paths with Bundy, Healey was on a positive and productive path. When she left for college at the University of Washington in 1970, no one doubted that she would succeed.

Healey was a stellar singer and applied herself to her studies with fervor. As a psychology major, she made it her mission to work with adolescents with mental disabilities and disorders. She also worked for the school’s radio station as a skiing-area weather reporter.

In 1974, as the 21-year-old entered her senior year, she became more autonomous than ever. She moved into a greenhouse with a handful of her closest friends. She gladly woke up early for her radio station job every day, including the day before she went missing.

The evening that Healey went missing

On January 31st, the evening before her disappearance, she went out to a tavern called Dante’s to share some beer with a few friends. However, she retired home early to call her boyfriend. At 11:30 p.m., Healey popped into one of her suitemates rooms to chat, seeming happy and undisturbed. At 12 a.m., Healey went downstairs to her room. That was the last time that anyone saw Lynda Ann Healey alive.

At 12 a.m., Healey went downstairs to her room. That was the last time that anyone saw Lynda Ann Healey alive.

The next morning, her next-door-suitemate, Barbara Little, was woken up by Healey’s 5:30 a.m. alarm. While Healey typically turned it off, the alarm didn’t stop ringing. Little poked her head in to check on Healey; she was nowhere to be found. At first, Little didn’t figure that Healey was in any kind of danger. Besides her ringing alarm, nothing was disturbed in Healey’s room.

However, all of her suitemates began to worry once Healey’s boss asked why she never showed up to work. She also missed a family dinner that evening, prompting a worried call from her parents. Her suitemates decided to investigate. In Healey’s room, they found that some of her bedding was missing. Additionally, blood was on the sheets, as well as on one of her nightgowns.

Fighting for justice for Healey

After discovering that their back door was unlocked, her suitemates called the police. Authorities also struggled to determine whether or not any foul play had occurred. Healey’s room was neat and in order, besides the traces of blood on her sheets. However, the bloody neck of her nightgown led the police to believe a crime had occurred. In light of the minimal evidence, police struggled to grasp onto a lead.

In 1975, Healey’s skull was located on Taylor Mountain, bringing a devastating end to her story. In 1978, Bundy, who was convicted of multiple murders, admitted that Healey was his first victim. It was discovered that he lived just three blocks from Healey.

Wikimedia Commons

Her horrifying death rattled the media, yet she is remembered as a passionate young woman whose life was taken far too soon.

A deeper dive — Related reading from the 101:

· The eccentric and lavish lifestyle of kingpin, Pablo Escobar | Finance101

Pablo Escobar’s criminal reputation is as notorious as Ted Bundy’s.

· Looking for cheap real estate? The solution may haunt you | Finance101

Discounted property may come at the cost of your peace of mind…especially if you invest in a murder house.